Haredi Employment Challenge in the News

It’s widely accepted that a nation’s prosperity depends greatly on the activity and viability of its workforce. To that end, a recent Bloomberg article raises the concern that high levels of unemployment among the growing Haredi (ultra Orthodox Jews) population in Israel—currently at more than 60% among Haredi men—pose an untenable economic burden on the State and Israeli taxpayers.

August 3, 2010

It’s widely accepted that a nation’s prosperity depends greatly on the activity and viability of its workforce. To that end, a recent Bloomberg article raises the concern that high levels of unemployment among the growing Haredi (ultra Orthodox Jews) population in Israel—currently at more than 60% among Haredi men—pose an untenable economic burden on the State and Israeli taxpayers. The article echoes the groundbreaking and troubling findings released earlier this year by the Taub Center for Social Policy Studies* that examined Israeli poverty, non/unemployment rates, and school enrollment trends, specifically among Israeli Arabs and Haredim.

JDC’s TEVET partnership with the Israeli government, cited in the article, helps break this cycle of poverty and dependency by breaking down the barriers to that keep a number of populations—notably Haredim, Israeli Arabs, individuals with disabilities, immigrants, and young adults—from participating in Israel’s workforce.

Another reminder that JDC, whose partnerships with the Israeli government provide successful solutions to Israel’s most pressing social challenges, is ahead of the game.

*Taub is an independent research institute that receives support from JDC.

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